Public Lecture on Indigenous Peoples and Law

Public Lecture on Indigenous Peoples and Law This inaugural Sydney Law School public lecture on Indigenous Peoples and Law will be delivered by Associate Professor Nicole Watson, on the topic of ‘Indigenous Women, Outlaw Culture and the Law’. The University of Sydney Law School, the oldest in Australia, has long taught almost exclusively the laws brought …

JSI Seminar: Fidelity to Real-World Politics: Political Realism under Conditions of Modernity

JSI Seminar: Fidelity to Real-World Politics: Political Realism under Conditions of Modernity Speaker: Lukas Opacic, Sydney Law School In recent years, the debate between political moralists and political realists has enjoyed increasing relevance within the philosophical literature, and this presentation adds another voice to that debate. Lukas Opacic begins by outlining what he regards as …

JSI Seminar: Law’s People

JSI Seminar: Law’s People Speaker: Dr Susan Bartie, University of Tasmania Alice Erh-Soon Tay was appointed as Challis Professor of Jurisprudence at the Faculty of Law at the University of Sydney in 1975. She became the first Asian-Australian and second woman to become a law professor at an Australian university. Her appointment brought with it a …

JSI Seminar: Expertise for the End of History: The Rise of Comparative Constitutional Law in the 1990s

JSI Seminar: Expertise for the End of History: The Rise of Comparative Constitutional Law in the 1990s Speaker: Dr Dylan Lino, University of Queensland Since the 1990s, the fortunes of comparative constitutional law as a field of scholarly enquiry have risen stratospherically. In accounting for the field’s rapid ascent and consolidation, scholars typically identify as …

JSI Seminar: What is the point of going to school?

JSI seminar: What is the point of going to school? Speaker: Dr Luara Ferracioli, The University of Sydney Is there an interest that children have, qua children, which is uniquely or best served by their going to school? In the paper that Dr Luara Ferracioli will present at this seminar, she and Dr Ryan Cox argue …

JSI Seminar: Aggregated Legislative Intentions

JSI Seminar: Aggregated Legislative Intentions There is scepticism from certain sectors of legal academia and the judiciary regarding the notion of legislative intent. It seems problematic to say that a large group of people (e.g. parliament) has intent. In this paper David Tan argues that one can understand legislative intent through the lens of aggregation …

JSI Seminar: Sovereignty and Absolutism

JSI Seminar: Sovereignty and Absolutism For some contemporary commentators, sovereignty is an obsolete and dangerous concept. A negative or sceptical attitude towards sovereignty, however, is not a new phenomenon. Looking back over the last few decades, it is not difficult to find examples of strong criticism of sovereignty in polemical political writings and academic scholarship. …

JSI Seminar: A Chinese Alternative to Sovereignty?: Revisiting the Qing Concept of ‘Stateliness’

JSI Seminar: A Chinese Alternative to Sovereignty?: Revisiting the Qing Concept of ‘Stateliness’ Speaker: Assistant Professor Ryan Mitchell, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Today, the People’s Republic of China is one of the most prominent global advocates of a (near) absolute conception of state sovereignty vis-a-vis international legal norms. It is hardly unique in …

JSI Seminar: Emerging neurotechnological therapies for schizophrenia: Implications for sentencing

JSI Seminar: Emerging neurotechnological therapies for schizophrenia: Implications for sentencing Allan McCay (University of Sydney and Macquarie University), Saar Lively (Columbia University), Marcello Ienca (ETH Zürich), Fabrice Jotterand (Medical College of Wisconsin and University of Basel), Rafael Yuste (Columbia University), Philipp Kellmeyer (University Medical Center Freiburg, University of Freiburg, and University of Zürich). In this …

JSI Seminar: Democracy and the Administrative State

JSI Seminar Series: Democracy and the Administrative State Speaker: Professor Edward L. Rubin, Vanderbilt University Theories of democracy are abundant, and becoming more so, but none seem to incorporate the administrative nature of the modern state. Either they ignore it, which makes the theory a form of alternative history, akin to science fiction, or they …