Future crime problems and security solutions – How to anticipate them and what to do about them – Law School: Events Future crime problems and security solutions – How to anticipate them and what to do about them – Law School: Events

Future crime problems and security solutions

Future crime problems and security solutions – How to anticipate them and what to do about them

Future crime problems and security solutions – How to anticipate them and what to do about them

Speaker: Emeritus Professor Paul Ekblom, University of Arts London

 

Crime is changing at an accelerating pace, and security is struggling to keep up. While this challenge is most marked in the cyber domain, it is true also in the predominantly physical world with advances in technology such as power supply and storage, lighting and armour. And smart products and environments, connected through the Internet of Things, bring the two domains together. For governments, police and other security services, and private companies to keep on top of the threats over the medium to longer term, vital strategic requirements are the capacities to detect emergent criminal threats early and respond; to out-innovate adaptive offenders in a world of political, economic, social, technological and environmental change; and, arguably the most difficult of all, to anticipate upcoming threats over a range of timescales reflecting how long it takes to develop, agree and deploy practical solutions. Paul Ekblom has recently contributed to a course on Horizon Scanning for the Masters in Crime Science at University College London and will present a suite of frameworks for addressing the future of crime and security systematically.

About the speaker
Paul Ekblom is Emeritus Professor of Design against Crime at the University of the Arts London; also visiting professor at the Department of Security and Crime Science, University College London and the Applied Criminology and Policing Centre, University of Huddersfield. He spent much of his career on crime prevention and policing research at the UK Home Office and then a decade on design against crime. Paul originated the 5Is model for capturing and sharing crime prevention practice knowledge (see more details here) and many other frameworks including the Conjunction of Criminal Opportunity. Recent work has involved horizon scanning, evolutionary arms races between offenders and preventers, updating the concepts of CPTED (crime prevention through environmental design), counterterrorism toolkits and cybercrime. Recent international collaborations have been with the European Forum on Urban Security (EFUS) and the EU Crime Prevention Network.

Time: 6-7.15pm (refreshments will be served)

CPD Points: 1

This event is co-hosted by the Sydney Institute of Criminology (The University of Sydney Law School) and the Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC). This event has been made possible by the sponsorship of the AIC.

 

Location: The University of Sydney Law School, COMMON ROOM, Level 4, New Law Building (F10), Eastern Avenue, Camperdown

Date

Nov 25 2019
Expired!

Time

6:00 pm - 7:15 pm

Cost

Free, however registration is essential.

More Info

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Location

Common Room, Level 4, Sydney Law School
New Law Building (F10), Eastern Avenue, The University of Sydney (Camperdown Campus)

Organizer

Professional Learning and Community Engagement
Phone
02 9351 0429
Email
law.events@sydney.edu.au
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