JSI Seminar: The Modern Approach to Statutory Interpretation

JSI Seminar: The Modern Approach to Statutory Interpretation Speaker: Professor Dale Smith, The University of Melbourne It is now common, in Australia and in a number of other jurisdictions, to speak of “the modern approach to statutory interpretation”. Many of the details of this approach are unclear or contested. However, the modern approach consists at …

Teaching Material: The Pedagogy of Political Economy in Australian Law Schools

Teaching Material: The Pedagogy of Political Economy in Australian Law Schools CALL FOR PAPERS – submissions due by 30 June 2022 Symposium on 29 – 30 November 2022 Australia’s political and economic system is built on exploitation. From the violent foundational occupation of Indigenous lands, to the ongoing denial of Indigenous sovereignty over those lands; …

JSI Seminar: Louise Richardson-Self & Gabrielle Mardon, “Stuck in Suffering: A Philosophical Exploration of Violence”

JSI Seminar: Louise Richardson-Self & Gabrielle Mardon, “Stuck in Suffering: A Philosophical Exploration of Violence” Speakers: Louise Richardson-Self, University of Tasmania and Gabrielle Mardon, PhD candidate, University of Tasmania This paper considers and evaluates some of the elastic applications of the term “violence”. Some of the most well-known applications are structural, symbolic, epistemic, psychosocial, and …

JSI Seminar: Fidelity to Real-World Politics: Political Realism under Conditions of Modernity

JSI Seminar: Fidelity to Real-World Politics: Political Realism under Conditions of Modernity Speaker: Lukas Opacic, Sydney Law School In recent years, the debate between political moralists and political realists has enjoyed increasing relevance within the philosophical literature, and this presentation adds another voice to that debate. Lukas Opacic begins by outlining what he regards as …

JSI Seminar: Expertise for the End of History: The Rise of Comparative Constitutional Law in the 1990s

JSI Seminar: Expertise for the End of History: The Rise of Comparative Constitutional Law in the 1990s Speaker: Dr Dylan Lino, University of Queensland Since the 1990s, the fortunes of comparative constitutional law as a field of scholarly enquiry have risen stratospherically. In accounting for the field’s rapid ascent and consolidation, scholars typically identify as …

JSI Seminar: What is the point of going to school?

JSI seminar: What is the point of going to school? Speaker: Dr Luara Ferracioli, The University of Sydney Is there an interest that children have, qua children, which is uniquely or best served by their going to school? In the paper that Dr Luara Ferracioli will present at this seminar, she and Dr Ryan Cox argue …

JSI Seminar: Aggregated Legislative Intentions

JSI Seminar: Aggregated Legislative Intentions There is scepticism from certain sectors of legal academia and the judiciary regarding the notion of legislative intent. It seems problematic to say that a large group of people (e.g. parliament) has intent. In this paper David Tan argues that one can understand legislative intent through the lens of aggregation …

Julius Stone Address 2021: Can the People be Sovereign?

Julius Stone Address 2021: Can the People be Sovereign? The Address will be delivered by Philip Pettit, Princeton University and Australian National University The notion of sovereignty goes back to Jean Bodin, a 16th century French jurist. For him the sovereign had to be a single individual or a majoritarian committee—whether of an elite or of …

JSI Seminar: A Chinese Alternative to Sovereignty?: Revisiting the Qing Concept of ‘Stateliness’

JSI Seminar: A Chinese Alternative to Sovereignty?: Revisiting the Qing Concept of ‘Stateliness’ Speaker: Assistant Professor Ryan Mitchell, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Today, the People’s Republic of China is one of the most prominent global advocates of a (near) absolute conception of state sovereignty vis-a-vis international legal norms. It is hardly unique in …