Julius Stone Address 2021: Can the People be Sovereign?

Julius Stone Address 2021: Can the People be Sovereign? The Address will be delivered by Philip Pettit, Princeton University and Australian National University The notion of sovereignty goes back to Jean Bodin, a 16th century French jurist. For him the sovereign had to be a single individual or a majoritarian committee—whether of an elite or of …

JSI Seminar: A Chinese Alternative to Sovereignty?: Revisiting the Qing Concept of ‘Stateliness’

JSI Seminar: A Chinese Alternative to Sovereignty?: Revisiting the Qing Concept of ‘Stateliness’ Speaker: Assistant Professor Ryan Mitchell, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Today, the People’s Republic of China is one of the most prominent global advocates of a (near) absolute conception of state sovereignty vis-a-vis international legal norms. It is hardly unique in …

JSI Seminar: Emerging neurotechnological therapies for schizophrenia: Implications for sentencing

JSI Seminar: Emerging neurotechnological therapies for schizophrenia: Implications for sentencing Allan McCay (University of Sydney and Macquarie University), Saar Lively (Columbia University), Marcello Ienca (ETH Zürich), Fabrice Jotterand (Medical College of Wisconsin and University of Basel), Rafael Yuste (Columbia University), Philipp Kellmeyer (University Medical Center Freiburg, University of Freiburg, and University of Zürich). In this …

JSI Seminar: Democracy and the Administrative State

JSI Seminar Series: Democracy and the Administrative State Speaker: Professor Edward L. Rubin, Vanderbilt University Theories of democracy are abundant, and becoming more so, but none seem to incorporate the administrative nature of the modern state. Either they ignore it, which makes the theory a form of alternative history, akin to science fiction, or they …

JSI Seminar Series: Strong Constitutional Courts

JSI Seminar: Strong Constitutional Courts Speaker: Professor Rosalind Dixon, UNSW   ‘Strong constitutional courts’ are courts that exercise ‘strong ‘powers of judicial review in enforcing constitutional constraints – but that are also effective in enforcing those constraints. Institutional strength of this kind, the paper argues, is also the product of both the external political environment …